Taking a bite out of Apple

For aisthetika, we wanted to represent the idea that objects we see everyday can be part of a multi-sensorial experience…even if it’s unexpected or just plain weird.

Published
November 2, 2009
Reading Time
2 minutes

final image

A few months ago, Martin and I were in New York doing the final photo shoot for I Miss My Pencil with Nicolas Zurcher. One of our tasks for that week was to create photography for each of the 3 chapter title pages: aisthetika, punk manufacturing, love + fetish.

We dipped a teddy bear in black latex (love + fetish). We wrote graffiti on a brick wall with yarn (punk manufacturing). For aisthetika, we wanted to represent the idea that objects we see everyday can be part of a multi-sensorial experience…even if it’s unexpected or just plain weird.

We immediately called Andre Yousefi (our master prototyper) and the guys in the IDEO shop. They’re up for anything, and it was not at all hard to convince them to find an old Mac laptop and cut off one corner and ship it to us in the New York office.  IT provided a broken laptop and Jim Feuhrer was at the band saw within minutes, and loving every minute of it. Then we had to glue all the bits back together to give it that perfect assembled look that we just sliced the corner off with a bread knife.

My first thought when I got the request to cut a corner off the MacBook was that it should be a bite or two, literally shaped like you would take a bite out of a sandwich. And this quick experiment could represent us, as designers, biting back at the technology that people are so enthralled with that they don’t realize it takes up so many hours in their life never to be recovered. — Jim Feuhrer

I can’t add too much to the story apart from the absolute joy of cutting the corner off and the look of astonishment on all parties around in the Shop at the time with that look on their face’s “WHAT THE F*** ARE YOU GUYS UP TO!” and “That’s cool…” when they find out that it’s something for the Pencil book. — Andre Yousefi

It is the little things, even the ridiculous ones, that keep us inspired and provoke new thought…and that’s what this book was all about.

I think a large part of the book was an exercise in playing with the absurd and there seemed at the time that chewing on a corner of a laptop was a celebration of that absurdity. Now that the whole thing’s done it seems perfectly normal, like we do it every day. Maybe that’s the great thing about experimentation, weirdness turns to normality and so you continue to push for more stranger avenues of expression to test the limits of good and bad. Plus it is fun to cut up an Apple, they are just as pretty on the inside. — Martin Bone

For more information on the book, I Miss My Pencil, visit http://www.imissmypencil.com